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522017

Nevolia Journal No. 52-2017, PDF, Russian

The rubric Social Punishment opens with the Penal Department’s statistical report on the current state of the penal system in Russia, and with Yuri Aleksandrov’s Legal Practice column explaining the latest changes to legislation regulating the judiciary, law enforcement, and executive branches of power. That is followed by more of Fima Zhiganets’ funny sketches, titled “Zoo Tales 5”, in which an old zoo worker, all permeated with prison subculture, shares his experiences with a novice, while not actually differentiating zoo routine from that of his life in labour camp where he spent many years.

Next comes Yakov Gilinsky’s article “Punishment as a Result of Thoughtlessness”, in which the renowned criminologist explains that tougher repression does not actually slash the crime rate. The following two short stories by Boris Zemtsov are based on the author’s personal reminiscences of his years behind bars. In the Prison News column, Alexander Sukharenko provides a review of reports obtained from official penal bodies and the media. The issue, as usual, features records by the Prisoner Rights Defence Foundation about events and incidents within the penal system. Yuri Aleksandrov’s compilation Prison and the World highlights problems and prospects faced by prison authorities in different countries. Researcher Valentin Danilov follows with an analytical essay titled “On the Road to Fair Trial”, in which the author demonstrates Russian lawmakers’ full indifference to daily prison practices in the country. The rubric closes with Alexander Avgust’s sketch “The Earlier You Are Jailed…,” vividly showing that repentance and avowal of guilt are basically different things.

The History rubric opens with an absorbing linguistic analysis by Alexander Sidorov, “This Is a Holdup, Don’t Screw It Up!” in which the author explores the origin of the term “screw” [prison guard/turnkey] in the jail slang. The section and issue conclude with Alexei Mokrousov’s review “Four Books”.

512017

Nevolia Journal No. 51-2017, PDF, Russian

The issue opens with the rubric Prison Poetry telling the reader about the poetic contest of the same name held by the editorial board in 2016; the organisers’ further plans; and how the contest proceeded. The winners’ verse can be found there, too. The section Social Punishment opens with the Penal Department’s statistical report on the current state of the penal system in Russia, and Yuri Aleksandrov’s Legal Practice column explaining the latest changes to legislation regulating the judiciary, law enforcement, and executive branches of power. That is followed by more of Fima Zhiganets’ funny sketches, titled “Zoo Tales 4”, in which an old zoo worker, all permeated with prison subculture, shares his experiences with a novice, while not actually differentiating zoo routine from that of his life in a labour camp where he spent many years.

Tatyana Vyaznikova’s “Freedom in Captivity” is an account of the author’s visit to an exhibition of prisoners’ personal effects and works of art. Andrei Lovygin follows with “Once There Were…” – autobiographical sketches from the life of a veteran jailbird who cannot actually return to normal life, however hard he tries. In the News from Prisons rubric, Alexander Sukharenko reviews information received from official penal agencies and compiled on the basis of media reports. The issue, as usual, features records of the Prisoner Rights Defence Foundation about events and incidents within the penal system. In his story “Prosecutorial Tax”, Alexander Sukharenko analyses connections between the nearly uncontrolled power of the prosecutors and corruption within their community.

The section Boundaries of Incomprehension features Alexander Avgust’s short story “Without the Right to be Amnestied”, describing the horrifying atmosphere of lawlessness in which mental clinic patients live, who are exploited like slaves for unlimited periods of time and without any hope for justice to be ever done to them.

In the History section, you will find Alexander Sidorov’s absorbing analysis “I’m Like a Fool, Mess-Tin in Hand…” from the series “Proverbs and Sayings of Russian Prisoners”. The author explores the origin of the proverb cited in the title. The section and issue close with three literary reviews by Alexei Mokrousov – of two books about World War II and one about the 1930s.

502016

Nevolia Journal No. 50-2016, PDF, Russian

The section Social Punishment opens with Yuri Aleksandrov’s Legal Practice column explaining the latest changes to legislation regulating the judiciary, law enforcement, and executive power. That is followed by more of Fima Zhiganets’ funny sketches, titled “Zoo Tales 3”, in which an old zoo worker, all permeated with prison subculture, shares his experiences with a novice, while not actually differentiating zoo routine from that of his life in a labour camp where he spent many years. Alexander Khnykov’s publication “Tukhan” is based on the author’s recollections of his time in prison.

In the News from Prisons rubric, Alexander Sukharenko reviews information received from official penal agencies and compiled on the basis of media reports. The issue, as usual, features records of the Prisoner Rights Defence Foundation about events and incidents within the penal system. Coming next is Boris Panteleyev’s analytical article “To Obey Instructions or Uphold an Officer’s Honour?” in which the author, a member of a Public Oversight Commission, explores the opportunities for these kinds of groups to improve Russia’s penal system. In his publication “The Untouchable”, Alexander Sukharenko states that not all are equal before the law in Russia, although this is an officially proclaimed principle in this country. The section closes with Sergei German’s brilliant short story “The Strip” about prison morals and everyday routine.

In the History section, you will find Alexander Sidorov’s absorbing analysis of how official literature promoted prison folklore during the years of Stalin’s rule. The story is from the series “Proverbs and Sayings of Russian Prisoners”. The section and issue close with two literary reviews by Alexei Mokrousov – of a book of memoirs by a World War Two Soviet spy and a book about Russian prisons today.

492016

Nevolia Journal No. 49-2016, PDF, Russian

The section Social Punishment opens with a summary of the Council of Europe report on the situation in the member countries’ prisons in 2014. In his Legal Practice column, lawyer Yuri Aleksandrov comments on the latest changes to legislation regulating the judiciary, law enforcement, and executive power. That is followed by more of Fima Zhiganets’ funny sketches, titled “Zoo Tales 2”, in which an old zoo worker, all permeated with prison subculture, shares his experiences with a novice, while not actually differentiating zoo routine from that of his life in a labour camp where he spent many years. Several sketches by Alexander Khnykov under the common title “Alone on an Ice Floe” are based on the author’s recollections of his time in prison. In the News from Prisons rubric, Alexander Sukharenko reviews information received from official penal agencies and compiled on the basis of media reports. As usual, the issue features records of the Prisoner Rights Defence Foundation about events and incidents within the penal system.

The feature “Prisons around the World” highlights distinctions in the penal systems of different foreign countries. Coming next is Boris Panteleyev’s analytical article “To Obey Instructions or Uphold an Officer’s Honour?” in which the author, a member of a Public Oversight Commission, explores the opportunities for these kinds of groups to improve Russia’s penal system. In his publication “What the FSB Look After”, Alexander Sukharenko describes today’s functions of the Federal Security Service and some of its recorded successes. The section closes with a short story by Boris Zemtsov, “The Finding”, which is based on the author’s recollections of his prison-life experiences.

In the History section, be sure to read Alexander Sidorov’s absorbing analysis “Proverbs and Sayings of Russian Prisoners”, followed by an interesting artistic and historical review “Mysteries of Abandoned GULAG Camps” by Sergei Stepanov, and a selection of foreign media reports about legendary prisons, celebrity jailbirds, and notorious crimes. The issue closes with Alexei Mokrousov’s literary review “Two Books: Vasily Aksyonov’s Correspondence and Anne Applebaum’s Research Findings about GULAG”.

482016

Nevolia Journal No. 48-2016, PDF, Russian

The section Social Punishment opens with a brief account of the Russian penal system’s status as of 1 September 2015. In his Legal Practice column, lawyer Yuri Aleksandrov comments on the latest changes to legislation regulating the judiciary, law enforcement, and executive power. That is followed by Fima Zhiganets’ funny sketches titled “Zoo Tales”, in which an old zoo worker, all permeated with prison subculture, shares his experiences with a novice, while not actually differentiating zoo routine from his life in a labour camp where he spent many years. Featured under the heading No Comment are excerpts from Justice Ministry Directive of 3 December 2015, allegedly “clarifying” the rules of prisoners’ behaviour and provisions but in real terms subjecting prison inmates to additional hardships. Mikhail Burlyash follows with a reflective story the essence of which is accurately expressed in its title: “All Prison Terms End Someday”.

In the News from Prisons rubric, Alexander Sukharenko reviews information received from official penal agencies and compiled on the basis of media reports. As usual, the issue features records of the Prisoner Rights Defence Foundation about events and incidents within the penal system. That is followed by a selection of foreign media reports under the heading “Prisons around the World”. Another short story by Mikhail Burlyash, “From the Life of Marat Bochka”, is based on the author’s recollections of the years he spent in prison. Alexander Sukharenko, in his economic and social analysis “The Spiral of Lawlessness”, explores the impact of the current economic crisis in Russia on the growing crime rate. Featured next are more of autobiographic “Prison Sketches” by Leonid Agafonov. The section closes with an excerpt from Boris Zemtsov’s unpublished book “A Little Bit of Prison in an Otherwise Decent Biography”.

In the History section, you will find Alexander Sidorov’s absorbing analysis “National History as Reflected in the History of an Underworld Song: ‘Smash-and-Grab Boys’”, followed by a selection of foreign media reports about legendary prisons, celebrity jailbirds, and notorious crimes. The issue closes with Alexei Mokrousov’s reviews of two books – “Letters from Prison” by Ilya Gabai and “Fragments of the Past” by Clara Strada-Yanovich.

472015

Nevolia Journal No. 47-2015, PDF, Russian

The section Social Punishment opens with a brief account of the Russian penal system’s status as of 1 September 2015. In his Legal Practice column, lawyer Yuri Aleksandrov comments on the latest changes to legislation regulating the judiciary, law enforcement, and executive power. That is followed by a short story by Fima Zhiganets, “Sleep, Honey, Sleep”, where dialogues brim with funny jargon words and expressions. Next comes yet another excerpt from Boris Zemtsov’s autobiographic book, currently being prepared for printing, about the author’s sudden, unexpected imprisonment, and more of autobiographic “Prison Sketches” by Leonid Agafonov. In the News from Prisons rubric, Aleksandr Sukharenko reviews information received from official penal agencies and compiled on the basis of media reports. As usual, the issue features records of the Prisoner Rights Defence Foundation about events and incidents within the penal system. Aleksandr Sukharenko, in his economic and social analysis “Crime Growth Curve”, explores the impact of the ongoing economic crisis in Russia on the crime rate. More excerpts from Vladimir Smirnov’s book “The Last Inquest” about the author’s time in prison are followed by “Scenes from Prison Life” by Maksim Gromov, a celebrity jailbird from the ranks of National Bolsheviks. In his analytical article “Russian Prisons in the 21st Century”, Mikhail Burlyash attempts to formulate the main distinctive features of modern prison life. The short story “Love and Psychiatry” by Sergei Putilov describes the author’s attempts to protect his beloved girl from forced psychiatric treatment. The section closes with an Institute for Modern Society Problem Studies report titled “Comparative Characteristics of Penitentiary Systems in Russia and Other Countries”.

In the History section, you will find Aleksandr Sidorov’s absorbing analysis “National History as Reflected in the History of Underworld Song”, and Alexei Mokrousov’s reviews of three interesting books.

462015

Nevolia Journal No. 46-2015, PDF, Russian

The section Social Punishment opens with a very curious document – the Russian Penal Service’s report on its work with citizens’ appeals. Lawyer Yuri Aleksandrov, in his Legal Practice column, comments on the latest changes to legislation regulating the judiciary, law enforcement, and executive power. That is followed by an excerpt from Boris Zemtsov’s autobiographic book, currently being prepared for printing, about the author’s sudden, unexpected imprisonment. An anthology of masterfully-written prison sketches under the common title “Bullfinch on a Red Rowan Tree” describes the unceasing anxiety any former prisoner is bound to feel.

In the News from Prisons rubric, Aleksandr Sukhorenko reviews information officially received from government agencies and compiled on the basis of media reports. As usual, the issue features records of the Prisoner Rights Defence Foundation about events and incidents within the penal system. Excerpts from Vladimir Smirnov’s book “The Last Inquest” about the author’s time in prison are followed by “Mermaid”, a funny short story from prison life by Mikhail Burlyash. The section closes with “Delusions of Conscience” – Boris Panteleyev’s reflections on the penal system’s performance, specifically its work with Public Supervisory Boards.

In the History rubric, you will find an absorbing entertaining analysis “Prison Songs in Russian Culture” by Aleksandr Sidorov, and two contributions by Alexei Mokrousov – “An Endless Story”, a review of Cecile Vessier’s book “For Your and Our Freedom”, and “Contempt and Conviction”, a summary of documentaries shown during the 37th Film Festival in Moscow.

452015

Nevolia Journal No. 45-2015, PDF, Russian

The section Social Punishment opens with an account of the Russian penal system’s status as of 1 July 2015. In his Legal Practice column, lawyer Yuri Aleksandrov comments on the latest changes to legislation regulating the judiciary, law enforcement, and executive power. That is followed by Fima Zhiganets’ humorous short story “Law Is Law”, written in the language characteristic of the criminal world. Boris Zemtsov follows with three stories under the common title “Prison’s Parallel Reality”, showing how the abyss of captivity changes the everyday reality of prison inmates. Next comes a short story by Aleksandr Avgust, “Aura’s Influence”, about prison physicians embarking on the path of crime. In the News from Prisons rubric, Aleksandr Sukhorenko reviews information received from government agencies and compiled from media reports. As usual, the issue features records of the Prisoner Rights Defence Foundation about events and incidents within the penal system, followed by the third part of Aleksander Pirogov’s “Diaries of an Accused Man”. The story “Looking Back Over the Years” by our long-time contributor Igor Kholodyakov, a prison teacher of literature, sums up reflections by his pupil, Vladimir Shaman, on what strikes him as “living with dignity”. The section closes with the report “On the Non-Efficiency of Budget Spending on the Penal System”, prepared by the Institute for Studies of Modern Society Problems.

The No Comment section features a collection of photos Yuri Tutov has made in different Russian prisons.

In the History section, be sure not to miss an absorbing historical review by Aleksandr Sidorov entitled “Father Makhno, Benya Krik and a Gipsy Woman from Odessa: An Unbreakable Union of Underworld Music and the Soviet Cinema”.

442015

Nevolia Journal No. 44-2015, PDF, Russian

The section Social Punishment opens with an account of the Russian penal system’s status as of 1 June 2015. In his Legal Practice column, lawyer Yuri Aleksandrov comments on the latest changes to legislation regulating the judiciary, law enforcement, and executive power. That is followed by Fima Zhiganets’ gripping narrative “The Kind-Eyed Cutter”, reflecting the morals and permeated with the language of the criminal world. Excerpts from memoirs by the Soviet-era dissident Vyacheslav Dolinin, “Life Rotates Around Prison”, are followed by Aleksandr Avgust’s two short stories on a topic the author constantly focuses on – the psychiatric clinic trap that anyone in Russia may expect to fall into someday.

Aleksandr Sukhorenko compiled his “News from Prisons” review based on information received from government agencies and media. As usual, the issue features records of the Prisoner Rights Defence Foundation about events and incidents within the penal system, followed by the second part of Aleksandr Pirogov’s “Diaries of an Accused Man”. The section closes with an article by Boris Panteleyev, “Professional Defence”, giving useful advice to those willing to defend their rights. The History section features Aleksandr Sidorov’s absorbing historical analysis “Jailland’s Currency”. That is followed by a selection on legendary prisons and prisoners worldwide, compiled by Yuri Aleksandrov from foreign media reports. The section and issue conclude with Alexei Mokrousov’s review of the book of memoirs “The Other Reality” by Ruth Zernova, a writer and translator who fought during the 1936-1939 civil war in Spain and then had to go through prisons and labour camps of GULAG.

432015

Nevolia Journal No. 43-2015, PDF, Russian

In his Legal Practice column, lawyer Yuri Aleksandrov comments on the latest changes to legislation regulating law enforcement and the judiciary and penal systems. That is followed by Vladimir Azhippo’s article “Post-Soviet Prisons’ Non-Transparency: Socio-Psychological Aspect”, which explains that reforming Russia’s penal system is so difficult because of its remaining closed to public scrutiny. “Prison Sketches” by Vladimir Smirnov, who already contributed some stories in the same genre earlier, are followed by renowned Norwegian criminologist Nils Christie’s article “Justice in Modernity”. Very regrettably, the author did not live long enough to see this publication: he died early on May 28 this year. Aleksandr Sukhorenko’s review “News from Prisons” was compiled based on information received from government agencies and media. As usual, the issue features records of the Prisoner Rights Defence Foundation about events and incidents within the penal system.

Next come “Two Short Stories” by recently-released Boris Zemtsov – the third series of his autobiographical writings about life behind bars. The section closes with excerpts from Aleksandr Pirogov’s diaries describing the time when he lived facing criminal charges.

The History section opens with “Memoirs as a Remedy Against Fear” – Alexei Mokrousov’s review of the brilliant book of short stories by A. E. Perepechenykh, “God Will Make Stones Cry”. In conclusion, enjoy Aleksandr Sidorov’s captivating analytical essay “Prisoner Bywords” and learn, among other things, why the routine expression of gratitude using the word “thanks” is disfavoured in the Russian prison world.

422015

Nevolia Journal No. 42-2015, PDF, Russian

The section Social Punishment features the Penal Department’s official statistics as of 1 March 2015. In his Legal Practice column, lawyer Yuri Aleksandrov comments on the latest changes to legislation regulating law enforcement, and the judiciary and penal systems. That is followed by the article “Public Control ‘Taming’ at Penal Institutions” by Lyudmila Alpern, a member of a Public Oversight Commission who describes prison management attempts to override the influence of public oversight bodies. Next, Aleksandr Kostyunin’s essay “Wolf Cubs” describes the atmosphere in a nautical school that is barely different from that of a penal colony for juvenile delinquents. “Prison News” comes next, compiled by Aleksandr Sukhorenko based on information received from government agencies and media. As usual, the issue features records of the Prisoner Rights Defence Foundation about events and incidents within the penal system, followed by the analytical report “Crime Statistics: Through Openness to Manageability” by criminologists Maria Shklyaruk, Dmitry Skugarevsky and others, on how concealed information about criminal offences undermines the efficiency of efforts to counter crime.

The History section opens with Kirill Podrabinek’s feature “In a General-Regime Penal Colony”, which is a chapter from the author’s book of memoirs being prepared for printing. The section and issue close with Aleksandr Sidorov’s “The History of a Popular Song”, in which the author gives an insight into the history of Russia and one of its oldest prisons as reflected in a well-known prison song.

412014

Nevolia Journal No. 41-2014, PDF, Russian

The section Social Punishment features the Penal Department’s official statistics as per 1 September 2014. In his Legal Practice column, lawyer Yuri Aleksandrov comments on the latest changes to legislation regulating law enforcement, and the judiciary and penal systems. That is followed by Lev Levinson’s article “Ray of Light at the End of the Tunnel” about pits and bumps in Russia’s anti-drug policies. Next, Boris Panteleyev, a member of a Public Oversight Commission, describes successes and setbacks in the work of such commissions. As usual, the issue features records of the Prisoner Rights Defence Foundation about events and incidents within the penal system, followed by an anthology of foreign media reports describing prison life in different countries around the world. The section concludes with two short stories by Boris Zemtsov under the common title “Home, Sweet Home!” describing the author’s own experience as a former deputy chief editor of the newspaper Nezavisimaya Gazeta and a former prisoner.

The History section opens with two stories by Aleksandr Sidorov, “Busting Out Through Tsar’s Window” and “Maniac in a Bra”, describing some famous jail-breaks. Alexei Mokrousov follows with three pieces – “…Judging by Intonation, He Meant Machine-Gun” – a review of I.Uvarova’s book “Yuliy Daniel and All, All, All”; “GULAG Labour: What to Know and How to Remember” – a review of the book “The History of Stalinism: Forced Labour in the USSR”; and “What Remains Aside from the Body” – reflections on a significant trend in modern art that is based on torture of the human body. In his story “Two Years on the Kama River”, dissident Mikhail Rivkin recollects his time in the Chistopol prison. In conclusion, the new Nevolya edition provides information about the human rights movement “Russia Behind Bars”.

402014

Nevolia Journal No. 40-2014, PDF, Russian

In this edition of Nevolya magazine: The section Social Punishment features the Penal Department’s official statistics as per 1 September 2014. In his Legal Practice column, lawyer Yuri Aleksandrov comments on the latest changes to legislation regulating law enforcement and the judiciary and penal systems. That is followed by Aleksandr Khnykov’s story “A Travelling Soul”, where the main character attempts to break out of the prison world, at least only in his dreams. Next, Public Oversight Commission member Boris Panteleyev describes successes and setbacks in the work of such commissions. As usual, the issue features records of the Prisoner Rights Defence Foundation (PRDF) about events and incidents within the penal system, followed by an anthology of foreign media reports describing prison life in different countries around the world. The section concludes with two short stories by Boris Zemtsov under the common title “Gerasim from Barrack Five”, describing the author’s own experience as a deputy editor-in-chief of the newspaper Nezavisimaya Gazeta and a former prisoner.

The Individual Opinion section features an article by Aleksandr Sukharenko, entitled “Russian Underworld Kings Become Known in Europe”, with a commentary by Aleksandr Sidorov, a writer and prominent explorer of the prison world.

In the section Law and/or Order, you will find “Topical Legal Notes” by Valentin Danilov, a well-known scholar who spent ten years in prison on charges of espionage trumped up by the KGB.

The History section features Aleksandr Sidorov’s entertaining analysis “The Mystery of Taganka Tango”, exploring the origin of the famous prison song “Taganka”, with details about the notorious Moscow prison’s history reflected in that song and its numerous variations.

392014

Nevolia Journal No. 39-2014, PDF, Russian

The first section, Social Punishment, opens with the Penal Department’s official statistics as per 1 May 2014. In his Legal Practice column, lawyer Yuri Aleksandrov comments on the latest changes to legislation regulating law enforcement and the judiciary and penal systems. Next comes Fima Zhiganets’ funny story “Petya Petukhov’s Abort”. The section also features short stories by Aleksandr Khnykov under the common title “The Memory River”, about captivity’s ineradicable impact on people finding themselves in it. Those are followed by a PRDF chronicle of incidents in Russian penitentiaries, and an anthology of foreign media reports describing prison life in different countries around the world. Boris Zemtsov’s two short stories under the common title “A Soul Trampled Down by Unfreedom” are based on the author’s personal experience as a former deputy editor-in-chief with the newspaper Nezavisimaya Gazeta, and as a former prisoner. The section closes with Alexei Mokrousov’s article “Violence as a Magnet” reviewing films about violence shown during the International Film Festival in Moscow.

The section Individual Opinion features an anonymous author’s recommendations about how to behave during interrogation. The editorial board does not share his opinion, of which it warns the readers in a note ahead of the text.

In the History section, you will find Aleksandr Sidorov’s entertaining analysis “A Beaten Dupe’s Outlook” – an insight into the tragic history of a cruel battle waged in the criminal world, commonly known as “the Bitch War”.

382014

Nevolia Journal No. 38-2014, PDF, Russian

The first section, Social Punishment, opens with the Penal Department’s 2012 official statistics about penal systems in the EU member countries. In his Legal Practice column, lawyer Yuri Aleksandrov comments on the latest changes to legislation regulating law enforcement and the judiciary and penal systems. Next comes Fima Zhiganets’ funny story “The Devil’s Work”, followed by Aleksandr Khnykov’s short stories under the common title “Struggling for Life”, about prison’s ineradicable impact on those behind bars. Yekaterina Burdayeva’s essay “A Gulp of Freedom for a Prisoner” is dedicated to modern singer poet Mikhail Burlyash, who is currently serving a prison term while continuing to write verse and compose songs. His friends and fans clubbed together to help him publish a collection of short stories recently; Nevolya features a story from that book, titled “The Birch Tree”. That is followed by a PRDF chronicle of incidents in Russian penitentiaries, and an anthology of foreign media reports describing prison life in different countries around the world. The section closes with Alec D. Epstein’s article “Can One Be Prepared for a Pogrom?” about the increasingly strong censor pressure on the Russian-language media and Russian-language segment of the Internet.

The History section features Aleksandr Sidorov’s entertaining linguistic analysis “Lemonland”, exploring the origin and meaning of a funny expression that has made its way into folk songs and common sayings that are popular with prison inmates.

372014

Nevolia Journal No. 37-2014, PDF, Russian

The first section, Social Punishment, opens with the Penal Department’s official statistics as per 1 February, 2014. In his Legal Practice column, lawyer Yuri Aleksandrov comments on the latest changes to legislation regulating law enforcement and the judiciary and penal systems. Next comes “Showdown in the Smaller Barrack”, a funny prison tale by Fima Zhiganets, followed by Dmitry Marachevsky’s story “A Big-Time Ride” – sketches about the daily routine in a labour camp. A PRDF chronicle of incidents in Russian penitentiaries is followed by an anthology of foreign media reports describing prison life in different countries around the world. The section closes with Maxim Gromov's recollections of his own time in a prison cell.

The section Behind the Wall features two stories by Aleksandr Avgust about psychiatric repressions against prisoners in Russia.

The History section opens with Alec D. Epstein’s article “Art under Prosecution”, dedicated to the famous avant-garde art exhibition in Moscow’s Bitsevsky Park in September 1974 which police crushed down using bulldozers, and its impact on the development of contemporary art in Russia. That is followed by Alexei Mokrousov’s review (“Sisyphean Stone”) of Aleksandr Podrabinek’s brilliant biographical book “Dissidents”. The section and issue close with Aleksandr Sidorov’s entertaining linguistic analysis “Yelets, the Home Town of All Thieves”, giving an insight into the sources and meaning of a common saying used by prison inmates.

362014

Nevolia Journal No. 36-2014, PDF, Russian

The first section, Social Punishment, opens with the Penal Department’s official statistics. In his Legal Practice column, lawyer Yuri Aleksandrov comments on the latest changes to legislation regulating the judiciary,law enforcement and penal systems. Next come a few masterful sketches under the common heading “Drenched with Prison Air” by one of Nevolya’s constant contributors, Aleksandr Khnykov. In his story “Human Destiny”, Igor Tsagoyev describes Russian law enforcement’s unlawful methods of work as tested on his own skin. That is followed by two short stories – “The Moneychanger” by prisoner Mikhail Burlyash and “Labour Camp Sketches” by another author serving time inprison. A PRDF chronicle of incidents in Russian penitentiaries is followed by an anthology of foreign media reports describing prison life in different countries around the world. The section closes with Dmitry Rykunov’s analysis “HowWe Are Tried”, about today’s judiciary in Russia, and “TwoStories”, funny prison tales by Fima Zhiganets.

The History section features the article “The Bank of Azov & the Caspian Sea” by Aleksandr Sidorov. Based on his analysis of two phraseological expressions that have long become part of the Russian language, the author draws a bright picture of this country’s socio-criminal history.

352013

Nevolia Journal No. 35-2013, PDF, Russian

The first section, Social Punishment, opens with the Penal Department’s official statistics. In his Legal Practice column, lawyer Yuri Aleksandrov comments on the latest changes to legislation regulating the judiciary, law enforcement and penal systems. That is followed by a funny sketch by Roman Zhikh, “The Queer Name”, about a young gangster’s strange-sounding (at least to a Russian ear) name and the trouble situations it got him into. In his short story “The First Prison Term”, Dmitry Marachevsky recollects episodes from his own life behind bars. A PRDF chronicle of incidents in Russian penitentiaries is followed by Alexei Mokrousov’s three reviews – “Shooting Prisoners in Lenin’s Room Was Convenient” (a review of Sergei Papkov’s book “Terror Pure and Simple: Stalinist Policies in Siberia”); “Labour Camps Within and Without” (about a special programme of the 35th Moscow Film Festival); and “A Portrait Against the Background of Barbed Wire” (about the Berlin exhibition “GULAG: Traces and Testimony, 1929–1956”).

The History section features Aleksandr Sidorov’s breathtaking linguistic analysis “Comrade Wolves of Bryansk and Tambov” – an insight into the Russian byword “Your comrade is the [Tambov/Bryansk] wolf”. Based on his analysis of this phraseological expression, which has long become part of the Russian language, the author draws a bright picture of this country’s socio-criminal history. The section closes with an anthology of media reports about prisons and jailbird celebrities in different countries around the world, compiled and translated into Russian by Yuri Aleksandrov.

342013

Nevolia Journal No. 34-2013, PDF, Russian

The first section, Social Punishment, opens with the Penal Department’s official statistics. In his Legal Practice column, lawyer Yuri Aleksandrov comments on the latest changes to legislation regulating the judiciary, law enforcement and the penal system. That is followed by a funny sketch by Fima Zhiganets, “The Meeting Place Can Be Changed”, describing an episode from the work of Russia’s detective police in the 1900s. Alexei Batov’s story “Kresty” (the common name for the St. Petersburg penitentiary) reviews the pan-European tradition of prison building. A PRDF chronicle of incidents in Russian penitentiaries is followed by an anthology of foreign media reports about prisons in different countries around the world. The section closes with prisoner Dmitry Rykunov’s autobiographic notes “A Bad Start in Life”, describing a whirl of everyday events – awfully commonplace and ordinary – that dragged the author into the underworld.

The History section features a collection of foreign media reports about famous prisons and prisoners, translated into Russian by Yuri Aleksandrov; and Alexander Sidorov’s analyses “The Vologda Guard”, studying the Russian common saying, “The Vologda guard doesn’t laugh at jokes”, and “Secrets of the Long-Hole Drilling Bureau” about some fantastic escapes from prison.

332013

Nevolia Journal No. 33-2013, PDF, Russian

The first section, Social Punishment, opens with the Penal Department’s official statistics as of 1 February 2012. In his Legal Practice column, lawyer Yuri Aleksandrov comments on the latest changes to legislation regulating the judiciary, law enforcement and penal systems. That is followed by a funny sketch by Fima Zhiganets, “Taxi Drivers’ Night Watch”, giving an insight into the prison language subculture. Next comes Boris Kopylkov’s essay “Police Arbitrariness as Seen by Insiders and Outsiders”, in which the author recollects episodes from his own life behind bars. The sketches “Bits and Pieces” by Alexander Khnykov and “The Master” by Roman Zhikh, too, are based on the authors’ personal experience of serving time in prison. A PRDF chronicle of incidents in Russian penitentiaries is followed by an anthology of foreign media reports about prisons in different countries around the world. The section closes with Maxim Gromov’s memoirs “Prison is Your Home, Pal!”

The section Behind the Wall features the story “Business Trip” by Alexander Avgust, describing daily psychiatric violence against inmates as a prison routine, and a commentary to the Dima Yakovlev Law by Independent Psychiatrists’ Association President Yuri Savenko.

The History section features a breathtaking analysis by Alexander Sidorov, entitled “Chinese Tea for Vorkuta Prison Inmates”, which is based on the main theme of a well-known prison song.

322013

Nevolia Journal No. 32-2013, PDF, Russian

The first section, Social Punishment, opens with the Penal Department’s official statistics as of 1 February 2012. In his Legal Practice column, lawyer Yuri Aleksandrov comments on the latest changes to legislation regulating the judiciary, law enforcement and penal systems. That is followed by a funny sketch by Fima Zhiganets, “Showdown”, giving an insight into the prison language subculture. Next comes a story by former prisoner Max Makhmag, “Books, Lenin and the Movies”, in which the author recollects episodes from his own life behind bars. A PRDF chronicle of incidents in Russian penitentiaries is followed by an anthology of foreign media reports about prisons in different countries of the world. The section closes with Igor Kichanov’s story “Two Pranks”, written on the basis of his personal experience in detention.

The section Behind the Wall features the story “The Nuts Ward” by Alexander Avgust, describing the daily routine in a prison ward for inmates with confirmed or suspected metal disorders, and Ivan Markelov’s report “Prosecutors’ Inspections” about the work of the Civil Commission on Human Rights.

The History section opens with an essay about the prison of Bordeaux from the “Legendary Prisons” review compiled by Yuri Aleksandrov based on foreign media reports. The section and issue conclude with Alexander Sidorov’s detailed analysis “The Bataisk Semaphore: The Signals It Gives Us”, about prisoners’ transit routes and the origin of the “Bataisk semaphore” catchphrase.

312012

Nevolia Journal No. 31-2012, PDF, Russian

The first section, Social Punishment, opens with the penal department’s official statistics as of 1 December 2012, followed by Yuri Aleksandrov’s “Legal Practice” column commenting on the latest amendments to laws governing the judiciary, law enforcement and executive power. “Freedom, Freedom!” – a collection of short humorous sketches by Fima Zhiganets – gives an insight into the prison language subculture. The story “In a Sorcerer’s Captivity” reflects inmate Andrei Lavygin’s thoughts about how to preserve human dignity while serving a prison term. A PRDF chronicle of incidents in Russian prisons is followed by an anthology of media reports about daily life in penitentiary centres in different countries of the world. The section closes with the story "Girlfriend by Correspondence" by Max Makhmag, who recollects some real circumstances of his time in prison.

The History section opens with a collection “Legendary Prisons” about some of the world’s famous jails, compiled by Yuri Aleksandrov based on foreign media reports. The article “Torture and Execution in France” tells the reader, in its first part, about the 16-century methods of culprit punishment, and in its second part, about the last instance of the guillotine’s use in France. Boris Sklyarenko’s analysis “The Turning Point” looks back at some new trends in the Soviet secret police’s consistent struggle with the human rights opposition during the era of “advanced” socialism. The section closes with veteran rights defender Alexei Smirnov’s captivating recollections “The Choice”, and Alexander Sidorov’s entertaining analysis entitled “A Planet of Wonders”.

302012

Nevolia Journal No. 30-2012, PDF, Russian

The first section, "Social Punishment", opens with official penal statistics as of 1 December 2012. The "Legal Training" column by Y. Aleksandrov comments on the latest amendments to legislation regulating judicial, law enforcement and penitentiary practices. That is followed by a funny story by Fima Zhiganets, "The Striped Rat Catcher", written wholly in the prison-subculture language style. The stories “That Would Be Good for You” by Andrei Lavygin and “The Clink” by Igor Kichapov represent attempts by really talented writers to describe their first exposure to life in the conditions of non-freedom. A regular PRDF chronicle highlights events and incidents in Russian prisons. That is followed by “March of Millions: The Bloody Sunday” – excerpts from a diary by Nikolai Kavkazsky, a figurant in the "Bolotnaya Square case" currently under investigation in Russia. Prepared for publishing by Alec Epstein, the excerpts reveal the high degree of unfairness of the pending trial over Moscow human rights protesters. The section closes with an anthology of foreign media reports about prison life in different countries, and the story "Girlfriend by Correspondence" by Max Makhmag, who recollects some real circumstances of his years in prison.

The section “Behind the Wall” features Alexander Avgust’s story “The Querulous Paranoia Case” describing everyday life and morals in psychiatric prisons, as seen by the author’s own eyes, and the article “To Heal, Not Cripple” by Tatyana Malchikova, focusing on problems facing Russian psychiatry. The section closes with Heinrich Zeider’s analysis “A Letter from a German Madhouse”, describing German experience in providing psychological and psychiatric assistance to people.

The “History” section features Alexander Sidorov’s diverting analysis “Rostov – Odessa: A Criminal Couple Story”.

292012

Nevolia Journal No. 29-2012, PDF, Russian

In the new issue of our magazine, we would recommend paying your attention to the autobiographical book by Maxim Gromov, a member of the National-Bolshevik party who endured with courage an unfair trial and a difficult period of imprisonment accompanied by several lock-ups into the isolation ward. Be sure to read Yuri Aleksandrov's “Legal Training” column describing the latest amendments to criminal legislation. As usual, the issue features official penal statistics and traditional chronicles of the Prisoner Rights Defence Foundation (PRDF) about developments and incidents in Russian penal facilities.

The first section, “Social Punishment”, opens with official penal statistics as of 1 April 2012. In the “Legal Training” column, Yuri Aleksandrov comments on the latest amendments to legislation regulating judicial, legal and penitentiary issues. That is followed by the story “Prison Sketches” by writer Vladimir Smirnov who found himself in jail without any guilt. The article “An Awful Law”by Lev Ponomaryov describes human rights defenders’ efforts to prevent the passing of a bill that proposes considering a prisoner’s hunger strike as a grave offence. Mikhail Burlyash follows with a story entitled “A Brief Visit”, and our regular contributor Alexander Khnykov – with brief and masterly“Pictures from a Penal Colony”. PRDF chronicles provide details about incidents within the penal system, followed by an anthology of foreign media reports about prison life in different countries. The story “A Phone Call” by Max Makhmag is dedicated to the 50th anniversary of Alexander Solzhenitsyn’s novel “One Day of Ivan Denisovich”. Prisoner Dmitry Rykunov, in his article “Who Judges Us”, discusses the unfair judicial system in today’s Russia. Alexander Zimbovsky’s publication “The Torbeyev Case: Police Dislike Fires” gives details about a Left Front leader convicted on trumped-up charges. The section closes with a letter from the parents of minor delinquents humiliated in Aleksin juvenile colony.

The section “Sit and Read” features chapters from an autobiographical book by Maxim Gromov, a National Bolshevik courageously enduring a hard time in a prison’s isolation ward on a sentence passed in an unfair trial. That is followed by Alexei Mokrousov’s review of Yekaterina Matveyeva’s book “The Story of a Female Prisoner”, with an excerpt from the book. The section closes with excerpts from the books “People Die for Money” by Georgy Demidov and “Respite” by Primo Levi.

The “History” section features an anthology “Legendary Prisons” by Yuri Aleksandrov, describing some of the world’s best-known penal facilities.

282012

Nevolia Journal No. 28-2012, PDF, Russian

The first section, “Social Punishment”, opens with penitentiary system statistics as of 1 February 2012, followed by the “Legal Training” feature in which Yuri Aleksandrov comments on the latest amendments to legislation regulating the judiciary, law enforcement and executive power. Then comes Yuri Vdovin’s publication “To Destroy GULAG within Penal System”, in which the author cites facts proving that the penitentiary system in today’s Russia retains all the ugly things inherited from GULAG times. A story by prisoner Mikhail Burlyash describes the impact of modern communication facilities on the penal system. That is followed by PRDF chronicles about developments and incidents in correctional facilities, and an anthology of foreign media reports about prison life in different countries of the world. Alexander Zimbovsky’s article “Justice, Pure and Simple” gives details about the judicial case of Taisya Osipova. The next feature by Alec D. Epstein gives an insight into the history of anti-extremist legislation development. Boris Panteleyev’s publication “Penal System’s Bureaucratic Humanisation” sums up the results of NGO monitoring of prisoner rights violations. The section concludes with Boris Gladarev’s sociological notes about police performance in the run-up to the latest Interior Ministry reform.

The section “Behind the Wall” features a story by Alexander Avgust describing the author’s personal experience of staying in a psycho-isolation prison cell. In conclusion, the issue features three documents from the Civil Commission’s archives and a comment by Yuri Savenko on public organisations’ efforts to oppose “punitive” psychiatry practices.

272011

Nevolia Journal No. 27-2011, PDF, Russian

The first section, “Social Punishment”, opens with penitentiary system statistics as of 1 November 2011, followed by the “Legal Training” feature in which Yuri Aleksandrov comments on the latest amendments to legislation regulating the judiciary, law enforcement and executive power. Then comes Igor Kholodyakov and Gennady Tarnakin’s story “The Voice of the Prison Camp”, in which the main character, G. Tarnakin, an inmate of a juvenile penal colony, gets enchanted by the beautiful world of poetry. That is followed by A. Petrenko’s description of everyday life in a penal colony for women. Yuri Vdovin’s article “Independence, Liberty and Corruption” conveys the author’s impressions from a visit to a remand prison in Baltimore, MD. Next comes Prof. Yuri Baranov’s analysis “Sick Persons in Penitentiaries”, followed by chronicles of the Prisoner Rights Defence Foundation about developments and incidents in correctional facilities, and an anthology of foreign media reports about prison life in different countries of the world. In his story “Maxim Petelin’s Case: How to Become a Racketeer”, Alexander Zimbovsky describes a typical judicial case. This is followed by Alex D. Epstein’s analysis of how counter-terrorism legislation can be turned into an instrument of violence and repression. Lev Levinson reviews the latest amendments to criminal legislation. The section closes with Natalya Malykhina’s notes about her work as a juror.

The section “Behind the Wall” features Ivan Markelov’s notes “From Prison to Psychiatric Clinic” and stories by Alexander Avgust describing the author’s personal experience of staying in a psycho-isolation prison cell.

The section “Sit and Read” features masterly sketches “Life After Prison Camp” by Alexander Khnykov and a brilliant story entitled “Metamorphoses” by prisoner Eduard Mikhailov.

262011

Nevolia Journal No. 26-2011, PDF, Russian

The first section, “Social Punishment”, opens with the Penitentiary Department’s official statistics as of March 1, 2011. Yuri Alexandrov’s column “Legal Training” comments on the latest amendments to legislation regulating the judiciary, law enforcement and executive power. That is followed by the Council of Europe’s penitentiary statistics as of September 1, 2009. A story by A. Zimbovsky describes the demonstrative trial over Sergey Mokhnatkin, the sole person convicted in the framework of legal confrontation in Moscow’s Triumfalnaya Square between law enforcement and activists defending people’s constitutional right to hold rallies and demonstrations. In the article “Two Letters from the Prison Camp”, real prisoners describe Russia’s judiciary and penitentiary systems as they see them. That is followed by “A Watchdog Committee Member’s Notes”, in which Boris Panteleyev reflects on problems facing this newly established intra-penitentiary body defending human rights. The section closes with FDPR chronicles about developments and incidents within the penitentiary system, and an anthology of foreign media reports about prison life in different countries of the world.

In the section “The Boundaries of Incomprehension”, N. Khananashvili cites cogent arguments in defence of juvenile justice – a fragile, actually non-existent, legal institution in Russia – against frenzied attacks by judiciary officials.

The section “Sit and Read” features the final part of prisoner Eduard Mikhailov’s autobiographic novel “The Chui Valley, or A Farewell to Childhood”, followed by A. Laptev’s review of A. Naumov’s book “A Special Zone for Has-Beens” and A. Mokrousov’s detailed review of Dmitry Churov’s book “Among Those Reported Missing” with an excerpt from the book.

252011

Nevolia Journal No. 25-2011, PDF, Russian

In this issue, we would recommend paying your attention to the section “Behind the Wall” which describes psychiatric maltreatment of prison inmates, and not missing the beginning of prisoner Eduard Mikhailov’s autobiographic novel “The Chui Valley”. As usual, we cite official statistical reports by the Penitentiary Department and feature traditional chronicles of the Foundation in Defence of Prisoners’ Rights (FDPR) about developments and incidents within the penitentiary system.

The first section, “Social Punishment”, opens with official penitentiary statistics as of March 1, 2011. Yuri Alexandrov’s column “Legal Training” comments on the latest amendments to legislation regulating the judiciary, law enforcement and executive power. This is followed by the Council of Europe’s penitentiary statistics as of September 1, 2009. A story by Alec D. Epstein describes the case of Nikolai Avdyushenkov and highlights one of the most sensitive problems in cases where people are accused of extremist activity – the problem of incompetent expert opinions supplied to law courts.

Human Rights Committee head Andrei Babushkin describes the work of organisations administering public control over the police. Writer Vladimir Smirnov, currently serving a term of imprisonment, publishes his “Prison Sketches” – masterly descriptions of everyday life in a prison ward. These are followed by the FDPR chronicles about developments and incidents within the penitentiary system, and an anthology of foreign media reports about prison life in different countries of the world. The section closes with a collective complaint by inmates of Penal Colony No.1 in the Republic of Komi, reprinted from the Prisoners’ Union’s website.

The section “Behind the Wall” features Alexander Avgust’s story “The Speech Therapist” and data provided by the St. Petersburg Civil Commission on Human Rights about instances of psychiatric violence against prisoners.

The section “Sit and Read” opens with the first part of Eduard Mikhailov’s autobiographic novel “The Chui Valley, or A Farewell to Childhood”.

242011

Nevolia Journal No. 24-2011, PDF, Russian

The first section, “Social Punishment”, opens with official penitentiary statistics as of August 1, 2010. Yuri Alexandrov’s column “Legal Training” comments on the latest amendments to legislation regulating the judiciary, law enforcement and executive power. It is followed by the U.S. ambassador’s Wikileaks-sourced confidential message concerning Russian prisons. An article by Alexander Zimbovsky provides details about the Sokolov case. A statement by Russian human rights defenders spells out their stand on the penitentiary system reform. It is followed by a chronicle from FDPR materials about developments and incidents within the penitentiary system, and a selection of foreign media reports about prison life in different countries of the world.

The section “Behind the Wall” features two stories by Alexander Avgust and an article by Ivan Markelov about psychiatric clinic routine.

In the “History” section, writer Sergey Stepanov publishes more of his Nizhny Novgorod chronicles.

Finally, the section “Sit and Read” features prisoner Eduard Mikhailov’s story “Snow and Coal” with a note by Vitaly Lozovsky about the author, and an except from Primo Levi’s book “The Drowned and the Saved” with a review of the book by Alexei Mokrousov.

232010

Nevolia Journal No. 23-2010, PDF, Russian

The new issue’s main features include in-depth analysis of the government-proposed Police Law by a Public Verdict specialist and an article by Leonid Golovko on the questionable character of the prison reform initiated by the new command of the Federal Penitentiary Service (FPS). As usual, we cite official statistical reports by the Penitentiary Department, and feature traditional chronicles of the Foundation in Defence of Prisoners’ Rights (FDPR) about developments and incidents within the penitentiary system. We would recommend paying your attention to the section “The Boundaries of Incomprehension” featuring a lecture by, and an interview with, Nils Christie. The “History” section offers more of Sergey Stepanov’s absorbing chronicles of the history of Nizhny Novgorod.

The first section, “Social Punishment”, opens with official penitentiary statistics as of August 1, 2010. Yuri Alexandrov’s article “Legal Training” comments on the latest amendments to legislation regulating the judiciary, law enforcement and executive power. Igor Kholodyakov follows with a story based on the observations and reflections of a schoolteacher working in a correctional facility. An article by Boris Panteleyev gives an account of what is going on within the penitentiary system as seen by a human rights activist. Additional light on the matter is shed by a chronicle of events supplied by the FDPR. In conclusion, a collection of foreign media reports describes prison routine in different countries of the world.

A lecture by the world-renowned criminologist Nils Christie and an interview with him are to be found in the section “The Boundaries of Incomprehension”.

In the “History” section, writer Sergey Stepanov publishes more of his Nizhny Novgorod chronicles.

Finally, the section “Law and/or Justice” features three materials: a Public Verdict specialist’s comprehensive analysis of the draft Police Law; a review of the prison reform concept proposed by the government; and lawyer Leonid Golovko’s doubts as to the potential success of this reform launched by the FPS commanders.

222010

Nevolia Journal No. 22-2010, PDF, Russian

The first section, “Social Punishment”, opens with official penitentiary statistics as per August 1, 2010. Yuri Alexandrov’s article “Legal Training” comments on the latest amendments to legislation regulating the judiciary, law enforcement and executive power. The FDPR chronicles describing incidents within the penitentiary system include Grigory Pasko’s article “The Best Have Been Fired. Who Stays?” providing details about the resignation of high-ranking penitentiary officers. A lengthy analytical story by Aidar Sultanov focuses on the problem of censorship in its present-day form that results in the list of publications banned in line with court decisions growing day by day, as additionally proved by an excerpt from the Sova Information Analysis Centre’s periodical report.

The section “In the Name of Law” features Sergey Pashin’s story “Judicial Anarchy” about the collapse of judicial reform. It is followed by an excerpt from the report “Corrupt Practices in Court” prepared by the Russian Lawyers’ Association. Then comes Leonid Golovko’s article “Getting Lost Like a Babe in the Woods” analysing the reasons for the failure of judicial reform, and Ivan Fedotov’s account of one particular judicial case that has gone all the way to the Strasbourg court. Another case is summarised in Natalia Novozhilova’s story “The Frame-Up”. G. Pasko’s analysis states that the Supreme Court ranks 203rd in Russia in terms of judicial openness to the press. The section concludes with Alexander Zimbovsky’s feature “We Just Want Your House” supplying details regarding a specific case won in court by human rights defenders.

The section “The Limits of Misunderstanding” opens with Lyudmila Alpern’s article “Changing the Paradigm: From Struggle to Conciliation”, giving an insight into the system of “reparative” justice and modern criminal policies. An excerpt from a new book by the renowned criminologist Nils Christie explains to the reader the nature of hostile divisions among people.

Finally, the section “Freedom of the Individual” features a story by Kirill Podrabinek entitled “That Didn’t Happen, After All”, dedicated to the trial over prisoner of conscience Sergey Mokhnatkin, followed by an excerpt from the book “Enemies of the Nation Beyond the Arctic Circle” with a review by Alexei Mokrousov.

In conclusion, the third edition of Rossiyski Tyuremny Zhurnal [Russian Prison Journal] is announced.

212010

Nevolia Journal No. 21-2010, PDF, Russian

The new issue of Nevolya magazine focuses on censorship problems and abuses in the area of psychiatry. The series of articles featuring under the heading “Censorship” includes a story on GosNarkoKontrol [State Drug Control Agency]; another one on freedom-of-expression restrictions in the Internet; and a report on yet another crackdown on the organizers of an art exhibition. The stories about psychiatric abuses are collected under the heading “Behind the Wall”. We would recommend paying your attention to Sergey Stepanov’s absorbing historical chronicles in the “History” section and to Alexander Mulenko and Sergey Laryagin’s stories under the heading “Russia: A Nationwide Pre-Trial Facility”. The new issue also features official statistical reports by the Penitentiary Department, traditional chronicles of the Foundation in Defense of Prisoners’ Rights about incidents within the penitentiary system, and Alexei Mokrousov’s review of Xavier Emmanuelli’s book “OUT: L’exclusion peut-elleêtre vaincue?”. The first section, “Social Punishment”, carries official penitentiary statistics as per July 1, 2010, A. Mokrousov’s review of X. Emmanuelli’s book and chronicles by the Prisoner Rights Defense Foundation. The section “Behind the Wall” opens with Tatiana Malchikova’s article “An Ordinary Death” describing the tragic life story of an orphan and the evil practice of assigning inmates of children’s orphanages to psychiatric clinics. Ivan Markelov’s story “Children’s Right to Mental Health” describes the work of school psychologists. The article “The White Horse Rider” by Roman Chorny raises the issue of unjustified diagnosing of mental illnesses in children. The section ends with the story “Holidays” by Alexander Avgust, himself a former inmate of a psychiatric clinic having in-depth knowledge of everyday practices and morals in that kind of health institutions.

The section “Russia: A Nationwide Pre-Trial Facility” features two brilliant short stories – “The Little Ring” by Alexander Mulenko and “Law and Chance” by Sergey Laryagin.

The “History” section features Sergei Stepanov’s historical chronicles “Slaves in Nizhny Novgorod and Elsewhere” describing prison habits and ways in old-time Russia.

The “Censorship” section opens with Alec Epstein and Oleg Vassilyev’s article “GosNarkoKontrol over Culture” highlighting the problem of excessive censorship powers delegated to the Drug Control Agency. It also features Alexander Podrabinek’s story “Freedom of Expression: An Eternal Enemy of Power” reprinted from Yezhednevny Zhurnal. The author points to increasingly strong pressure exerted on freedom-loving web bloggers. Vera Vassilyeva’s article “Taganka Justice System vs. Creative Freedom” describes the trial over Andrei Yerofeyev and Yuri Samodurov, the organizers of the exhibition “Forbidden Art 2006”. The same topic is discussed by Alexei Mokrousov in his essay “Kafka and Facts of Life”.

In conclusion, the third edition of Rossiyski Tyuremny Zhurnal [Russian Prison Journal] is announced.

202009

Nevolia Journal No. 20-2009, PDF, Russian

The issue opens with Foolhardy Garry, a short story by Aleksandr Mulenko about life in penal colonies. Section Punishment of the Society contains statistical data on crime in Russia in January-September 2009. Two short stories by Max Mahmag describe dreams and holidays in an investigative isolation ward. We also present Prisons of the World, a piece by Yuri Aleksandrov about UN statistics for various countries where torture is used, shortage of prisons in Belgium, e-management in a Dutch prison, and conditions in Polish prisons. We continue publication of sketches by Alexandr Khnykov with a new selection titled The Men of Zone-2. We publish official data on the penitentiary system as of November 1, 2009 The subject of death penalty with its advocates and opponents is analyzed by Yuri Aleksandrov.

Documentary Reds and Blacks by Dmitri Morachevski describes «interior» wars among inmates of Russian penal colonies. These conflicts are provoked by so-called activists who accept rewards and benefits from prison administration.

The issue continues with the monitor of the Foundation To Protect Inmates: situation in prisons, protest actions, record of human rights violations for the period of September through November, 2009.

Discussion of prison reform proposed by the new management of the Russian penitentiary system is covered in the section titled From the Lips of the Superiors. In this issue we have included materials of a theoretical and practical conference on the reform of penitentiary system, including a report by the new director of the Federal Penitentiary Service, Aleksandr Reimer.

In the literary section we present an abstract from a book by Eduard Kocherguin, an announcement of Igor Sutiaguin’s book Halfway to Siberia and a review by Aleksei Mokrousov of a book of memoirs of former inmates of Norilsk called On Time, Norilsk, and Ourselves...

192009

Nevolia Journal No. 19-2009, PDF, Russian

The issue opens with a collection of short stories by Aleksandr Khnykov entitled The Inmates. Each separate story is a sketch of a small event or a person but all of them together provide a surprisingly precise description of the atmosphere of prison life. The Punishment of Society section contains statistics on prisons around the world. Here the reader can find information on the number of inmates in European countries, types of crimes, age of criminals, etc. An article by Djinna Litinskaya The Almighty Word is dedicated to the disproportionate consequences sometimes resulting from the wording of an evaluation document issued to a person by some low-ranking official. The issue offers official statistics of crimes committed in Russia during the first 6 months of 2009 and the same period of the previous year and a comparative analysis of both figures. The main character of Aleksandr Mulenkos short story Revenge is a typical director of a typical prison with his typical phobias, fears and predilections. As in every issue of the magazine, traditionally included is our Monitor of Protest Actions by Prisoners. This issue covers protest actions over the period of March through June of 2009.

Juridical Practicum by Yuri Aleksandrov explains recent regulatory changes in such areas as transportation under guard, probation, restriction of punishment for crimes against minors, etc.

Serguei Minins pamphlet Town-Garden sarcastically describes how police buy admissions of guilt from random suspects for crimes committed by somebody else.

In Beyond the Wall section, two short stories by Aleksandr Avgust are published under the common title of Crazy Life. Both stories are based on autobiographic material of this former patient of a psychiatric hospital.

The issue further presents two articles by Roman Chorny, president of Saint-Petersburg Civil Commission on Human Rights, The Chronicle of Violations of Human Rights in the Psychiatric System of the Russian Federation and Who Will Stop Injustice in the Yellow Houses of Saint-Petersburg? The articles draw on facts established by the Commission and reflect its efforts to defend Human Rights.

In History section, we publish Aleksei Mokrousovs review of Memoirs of a Former Infantryman and Prisoner of War by Yuri Apel and a short abstract from that book.

182008

Nevolia Journal No. 18-2008, PDF, Russian

The issue opens with “Izvestki”, a publication by Dmitry Morachevsky. From his personal experience, the author tells the story of a boy who breaks the law and is initially placed in a preliminary detention facility for children and then in a special school. The story is a unique evidence of barbaric conditions in which children are kept in such educational institutions not open for public inspection. The importance of such eyewitness story can only compare to that of the prosaic publication by Ruben Galiego who reveals the truth about what really goes on in government-run nursing homes for handicapped children. The “Punishment of the Society” section opens with statistics of crime in Russia and an update of the criminal penitentiary system. The next publication by Vassily Malinin (Doctor of Law and member of the Saint Petersburg City College of Lawyers) carries the title of “Combating drug trafficking: success or fabrication of criminal cases?” and addresses the widely practiced fabrication of criminal cases against rank and file drug users.

Next in item of the section is the Monitor of Protest Acts by Inmates, which has become a traditional element of each issue of the magazine. This time it covers protest acts by inmates in Russia between October and December 2008.

The “Sit Down and Read” section offers “The Barrack” - an essay commemorating Aleksander Solzhenitsyn by Oleg Pavlov, a well-known writer and recipient of the Booker award in literature.

The section also contains a critical review by Aleksey Mokrousov of Boris Grigoryev and Boris Kolokolov’s book “The everyday life of Russian gendarmes” printed by Molodaya Gvardiya Publishing House in 2007.

The “History” section presents “Citizen Pirates”, an article by Rostislav Gorchakov about little-known political processes that shook up the remote country of Siam in late 1930-s. Few researches outside that country are aware of the described events.

The last section, “Law and/or Justice” contains “Prior to the End of Term”, a legal publication by Yuri Aleksandrov examining all lawful options (other than review of judgment) for inmates to be released from prison before the end of their term.

172008

Nevolia Journal No. 17-2008, PDF, Russian

The first material of the issue is an abstract from a new novel by Liubov Budiakova Surveillance about the life of prisoners. The short novel by Vladimir Kuzemko Some nuances of the pre-investigation art describes routine work of law-enforcement agents. The magazine continues its publication of a series of materials by this author. Mikhail Alliluev in his article The Little Tour Guide shares a personal experience of his encounter with the functioning of law-enforcing agencies. Yuri Aleksandrov, permanent contributor to our magazine, in his column Legal Reference Guide consults the reader on the most acute legal problems. In his article What is Torture Aleksei Rafiev writes about wide use of torture in questioning and practical implementation of law. Maruta Goylo in her article Magnetism of the Jail critically discusses the project of development of infrastructure of Lithuanian prisons. In Muska, a short story by Maxim Gromov, we read about the life of inmates in prisons for dangerous criminals.

Under the same heading of Punishment of Society we are also publishing new statistics of the penitentiary system, our traditional list of Protest Acts of Prisoners and the most recent criminal statistics.

Under our traditional heading The Boundaries of Misunderstanding we publish materials related to the theme of Human Rights and Prison: the Everlasting Hostility.

The publicist and Human Rights activist Gennadi Cherniavski in his article We Need Solidarity More Than Ever Before writes about the trials of Human Rihts activists L. Ponomarev and B.Panteleev to be held in the fall.

In his article The Non-official Reaction to “Official Response” our Ukranian author Vladimir Ajippo describes the complicated relations between Human Rights activists and the authorities in the Ukraine.

In the History section we are offering an article by Rostislav Gorchakov The Admiralty Option on how the British Department of Labor hired former inmates in 1941 to serve on commercial ships.

The last section of the issue we are presenting two short stories: Commentary on Hell by Oleg Pavlov and Zen Gratitude to the Dead by Andrei Rubanov.

162008

Nevolia Journal No. 16-2008, PDF, Russian

The first material of the issue is by Valery Abramkin On the Situation in the System of Criminal Justice, where he gives a large panorama of today situation and its dangerous trends. The monitor Protest Actions of Prisoners is now a traditional information in our every issue. Here we publish information on the protest actions in Russian regions since March to June of 2008. Boris Panteleev in the article The Uncomfortable Freedom speaks about social and, firstly, housing difficulties that meets an ex-prisoner. The new statistic materials of Penitentiary System is also a traditional material of our issues. We continue to publish The Militiaman's Chronicle of Vladimir Kuzemko, based on the personal experience. The material of our author Yuri Aleksandrov is dedicated to the very actual theme of pre-trial prisons today. We publish an Abstract of as new Report of Amnesty International on death penalty in 2007.

This part of the issue we finish by the review of Aleksei Mokrousov on the book about Russian prisons for minor delinquents by Mary McAuly, the former head of Ford Foundation in Moscow.

In the next part Law and/or Justice we publish the text of A Project of a Law on colonies for minor delinquents and the text of the recently adopted law on the public control in prisons with comments and analytical articles (Yu. Aleksandrov, V. Lozovsky).

The part The boundaries of Misunderstanding is dedicated to a famous criminal case versus Yu. Samodurov, the head of Andrei Sakharov's Foundation and Museum because of the exposition in the Museum The Banned Art. We publish an abstract from the accusation and two independent expert materials by arts critic and philosopher E. Petrovskaya and philosopher O. Aronson.

The last part Books on Prison contains a pre-print of a new book of our author, famous writer Oleg Pavlov. Here we re-publish also the article by Serguei Pashin The Court and Prison Population.

152008

Nevolia Journal No. 15-2008, PDF, Russian

The first material of the issue is the text by Serguei Brovchenko Behind bars. The author describes his life journey from the investigator of KGB to barrister and now Human Rights activist. Yuri Aleksandrov in the material Juridical Training eplains the terms «Persistent Infringer of the Regime» and «Hooliganism» and the rules of trasportation of convicts as well as novels of 2007 in the Penitentiary Code. Also in the first part of the issue we continue to publish The Militiaman's Cronicle by Vladimir Kuzemko. In the material The Cost of Freedom: the Dacha of the Head of the Regional Penitentiary Administation the correspondent from Archanguelsk Aleksandr Kuleshov tells about the well-known case of this officer.

The Human Rights Activist Evgueni Ihlov in the article Amur, the River of Blood describes in details about the events of January 2008 in the colony #5 in the region Amurski where 700 or 800 mates protesting against beating en masse by the staff cut veins.

Here we also publish a part of the Annual Report of the Commissinary on the Human Rights in Russian Federarion jn the Human Rights in the places of confinement; statistics of the penitentiary system; statistics on the criminality; Monitor of the protest actions of prisoners which became traditional element of our issues; and an informational material on the prison industry in US.

In the part The Writers on the Rrison we publish a story by Oleg Pavlov about the life of the soldiers of custody in colonies. Two stories by Aleksandr Mulenko are also dedicated to the routine life of prison.

In the part Behind the bars we give abstracts from a book Help yourself where the normative acts for suspected, convict and accused person are collected by the Saint-Petersbourg branch of the Human Rights organization Committee for the Civil Rights.

In the same part we publish the material of the Human Rights activist Boris Panteleev Penitentiary Department and Human Right Activists where he analyses the relations between penitantiary system and Human Rights activists who are engaged in prison problems.

In the issue we publish also notices of the new web-sites and books on the main themes of the magazine.

142007

Nevolia Journal No. 14-2007, PDF, Russian

In the first material of the issue the advocate Boris Palgov analyzes the course of the court reform in today Russia and comes to conclusion: it’s too early to speak that the reform has really improved the situation of the simple citizen. The second material is an abstract from the new book by Vladimir Kuzemko Notes of the operative officer. In the same part of the issue we publish (as it became traditional for the magazine) the penitentiary statistics, the official data of the Criminal Situation in Russia and the monitor on the protest actions of prisoners. In the following part The boundaries of misunderstanding we publish some materials dedicated to the discussion of the so called sections of discipline and order in today Russian penitentiary system. Their opinion express well-known lawyers and Human rights activists Valeri Abramkin, Mara Poliakova, Tamara Morschakova, Serguei Kovalev, Liudmila Alekseeva, Henri Reznik and also Evgueni Ihlov, Boris Panteleev and the psycologist Serguei Yenikolopov.

In this part we published also the actual material by Valeri Abramkin on the situation in the colony for juvenile delinquents (near S. Petersburg)

In the following part From official lips we give the floor to Yuri Aleksandrov who expresses the opinion of the penitentiary service on the work of “the sections of discipline and order”.

The materials of the part Behind the Wall are dedicated to the situation of children in children’s homes.

Marina Ternovskaya, the well-known director of the children’s home # 19 The Centre of the patronage education, speaks on her own experience of the work and the practice of patronage education that is under the threat because of the new Russian laws.

In the last part Histories are published the literary and publicist texts:

a short novel by Oleg Pavlov What a Flavor!, a short novel by Aleksandr Mulenko The Short-termed visit and an essay by the philologist Aleksandr Sidorov on a well-known song popular in the criminal culture.

In the issue we publish information on new books on our themes.

132007

Nevolia Journal No. 13-2007, PDF, Russian

The first material of the issue is the memoirs of Vladimir Kuzemko where the author describes vividly his personal experience of the work in law-enforcing bodies, accentuating the main problems of today Russian milicia. Some materials of the first part of the magazine are dedicated to the problem of a new quick and serious growth of the prison population in Russia. The problem is analyzed by well-known sociologist and criminologist Yakov Guilinski in his article Overtake and surpass? Vasilii Malinin in the material The strong must not be stronger than weaks speaks on the unconsidered reform of the penitentiary system that can break down of the working activities in penitentiary institutions. A well-known social psycologist, professor Valeria Muhina in the article Is the prison antagonism total? analyzes the role of prison psycologist in penitentiary system, insisting that under certain circumstances the prison psycologist can become mediator between prisoners and warders.

As in the last issue we publish the monitor of protest actions in Russian penitentiary system last months.

The Director of the Centre for the reform of criminal justice comments the disorders in the famous prison in S.-Petersburg Kresty and analyzes the causes of today riots in Russian colonies.

In small fiction pieces by Aleksandr Mulenko The rut and Great steppe authors vivdly describe the life conditions of today Russian prisoners.

The second part of the magazine Beyond the wall consists of the materials on the problem of taday psychiatric repressions in today Russia. In particular, here is covered the recent much-talked of case of the Human Rights activist Larisa Arap from Murmansk (materials by Yuri Savenko, Elena Basilieva and Albina Skripnik).

In two materials by Maksim Prytkov in the following part of the magazine Here I stand the experience of the Human Rights control in prisons and investigation of the cases on the violence of Human Rights by law-enforcing bodies.

In the part History we publish interesting memoirs of Serguei Hodorovich, the head of Solzhenitsyn Foundation for help to prisoners in the past, about the volonteers of this Foundation.

The last part Post mortem is dedicated to the 80 anniversary of prison poet Valentin Sokolov.

122007

Nevolia Journal No. 12-2007, PDF, Russian

The first material of the issue is a detailed article on Italian system of juvenal justice by Marina Goloviznina, following our publications on this theme. We publish statistics on the state of criminality in Russia, the state of the penitentiary system, the results of its work in 2006. The advocate Boris Palgov who and how can receive a qualified lawer's aid in Russia. The abstract from the Report of Commisioner on Human Rights in Russia presents the analysis of the situation in the penitentiary system in 2006. In the monitor of the fund "For the rights of prisoners" on can find the most serious cases of the violations of theHuman Rights in penitentiary system of the last months.

The main theme of the issue - "Nobody's kids" - is dedicated to the problems of the sick children on the charge of the state. It is harmful to read these texts, the readers can't change the situation, but all have to know it. The article by Aleksanr Melihov shows the grievious situation of children in psyconeurologic closed institutions. The article "The normal men make the normal money" by Nina Glazkova tells us about lives of the children who are on the charge of the child psychiatry in S.-Petersbourg in so called Centres of rehabilitative medicine. We publish also the appeal of Civil commission for rights of the interns of the in the cildren's home # 47 (one of the best in S.-Petersbourg) which the authorities are going to close. Ruben Gallego who have a personal experience of living in Russian children's homes presents an essay on relation of the society to the "excluded".

Under the heading "Defenders" we publish materials on the work of some Human Rights organizations for the rights of prisoners. Andrei Babushkin (Committee for the Civil Rights) tells on the successes and dificulties in visiting prisons. In the material by Alexandr Konstantinov (Cheliabinsk) one can read on the regional fund "The helping hand" which defends the persons who are victims of the State because of the convictions including, on its educative activity and defence of the human Rights of the prisoners. We publish also an abstract from the book of the head of the organization Nikolai Schur. The president of the organization "Man and Law" writes on the experience of this organization in cooperation with Federal Penitentiary Service in the republic of Marii El.

Also we publish a vivd picture of the behavior of road milicia by A. Mulenko. A. Sidorov describes the morals and manners of the prison communities.

The reader can find also the information on the new book edited by the Human Rights Centre "Memorial" "Application to the European Court on Human Rights".

112007

Nevolia Journal No. 11-2007, PDF, Russian

Issue as usual consists of three main blocks. The first one is dedicated to the normative documents, official statistics and juridical advices for prisoners. Stanislav Markelov (an advocate, works at the Institute of Superiority of the Law). His article is titled: European fairy tale in the reality of Russian penitentiary colonies. The author compares the principles of the European Penitentiary Regulations signed by Russia with real situation in prisons. One of the main contradictions, in his opinion, consists in the fact, that European penitentiary system has as its aim to isolate the criminal during the period of imprisonment and to prevent him from criminal activities after the imprisonment, and Russian system traditionally has as its aim to re-educate the person not taking in attention the self-respect of prisoner. This tradition leads to traditional existence of opposition of prisoners to penitentiary personal whose activities are almost not limited by strict regulations. This leads to an eternal conflict because the personal tries to do its job by hands of "good" prisoners, and this is forbidden by the European Regulations. The conclusion of the author is: though between the Regulations, even having the word "recommendations" in their title, and the reality of Russian penitentiary system there is a wide gap, they are very useful as a beacon, as a legal basis for all kind of efforts for humanization of Russian prison.

The following material is abstracts from European Penitentiary Regulations for strengthen the previous article.

The articles of Aleksandr Konstatinov "The Complaint of Supervision -- a Serious Thing" and "The Special Order of Court Examination" are materials for prisoners and "simple" men where the authors explains terms, competence of courts of various levels, the rules of complaints and court examination and gives clear and useful juridical advices.

The statistical materials of the issue: The Criminal Situation in Russia in 2006 (data of Home Ministry), here are the number of crimes, the types of crimes, social position of criminals in comparison with 2005 (tables and diagrams); The Brief Characteristic of Penitentiary System in Russia (qualifying date 2007/01/01) (data of Federal Penitentiary Service), here the number of prisoners and penitentiary workers, number of institutions, categories of prisoners and so on.

Olga Afanasieva in her material "Prison in Fashion" analyzes the cultural phenomenon of modern Russia where the prison slang, prison theme enter the everyday life, language of advertising and even public politicians. The interest for the theme embrace all strata of population. The possible reasons of this fashion are the subject of attention of the author.

As a useful information we publish The Regulations of Inner Order in Colonies for Minor Criminals 2006.

This document is briefly commented in the material "New Regulations for Colonies" by Vitalii Poloziuk, the Director of Department of social, psychological and educative work of Fedraral Penitentiary System.

In the second block we publish the essay by Boris Panteleev based on the personal prison experience "Games of Memory, or Paradoxes of the education". Somehow his thoughts correlate with the first article of the issue by S. Markelov, because the central place of the essay is the problem of preserving human dignity of prisoners.

In the following material by a member of Public Chamber Oleg Zykov "It's Necessary to be More Clever and Artful than Executive Superiors" the author tells about his personal efforts to mobilize inner resources of the penitentiary workers in reforming the system of colonies for minor prisoners and their possibility to influence the executive power which is not co-operative with NGOs. Now he succeeded to organize the Association of colonies for minor criminals where the functionaries cooperate with Human Rights activists. The problems and difficulties of such cooperation is the focus of the material.

The third block consists of historical materials. Some time ago in Moscow was organized an exhibition "Presents for leaders". It is described by well-known journalist Aleksei Mokrousov, mentioning the gifts to Soviet leaders given by leaders of other countries and simple people. The ideology of such phenomenon is analyzed in the article.

The article by Aleksandr Sidorov, researcher of the prison culture, "The police novel of the locomotive", is dedicated to a very interesting story of one song which many of Russians know as folk-lore song. The analysis of its authorship may be read as a detective story.

The last material of the block by Rostislav Gorchakov "The ballad of Red Jack" is a serious research based on documents of the relation of the population to the workers of law-enforcing bodies in 1930--1950 with many concrete details of everyday life chiefly in Siberia where the most part of GULAG camps were concentrated.

The fourth block is a material in memoriam of recently deceased Human Rights activist Andrei Borisov. Here we publish an obituary and an abstract of his text "Could All be Unuseful Afresh?" where he compares modern Russian prison with its analogue of the 19th century basing on the memoirs of prisoners.

102006

Nevolia Journal No. 10-2006, PDF, Russian

Statistics for professionals and journalists: The Brief Characteristic of Penitentiary System in Russia (qualifying date 2006/11/01) (data of Federal Penitentiary Service), here are the numbers of prisoners and penitentiary workers, number of institutions, categories of prisoners, other figures. Nils Christie answers positively the question he puts in the title "Is the Development of the Restorative Justice the response to shortcomings of Modern Penitentiary System?" He insists that restorative justice gives satisfaction to the victim of the crime, unlike the usual justice.

Yakov Gilinski, an eminent criminologist and sociologist, basing on sociological polls, states in his articles "Sociology on Tortures in Russia" that tortures are widely spread in Russian law-enforcing bodies.

The main block is dedicated to the International Conference "Prison Question: Research as an Instrument of Struggle (Russia and France, 1970ies - 2000s)". The reports (brief versions) of almost all participants are published in the issue. The first report by A. Bikbov, sociologist, introducing the conference and basing on the history of the struggle of Soviet dissident and French Group of Prison Information headed by M. Foucault, considers the struggle against penitentiary systems as an instrument of cognition. A French participant Daniel Defer tells the history of movement against the penitentiary system in France in 1970--1972. Filipp Artier (France) gives the history of the Group of Prison Information in details and bewails degeneration of its ideas. A. Roginski ("Memorial") puts in doubt even the possibility of comparison of French and Soviet history of the period. L. Alpern shares her personal experience of work as Human Rights activist in prison and her researches in Western penitentiary system. L. Alekseeva (Moscow Helsinki Group) speaks on the history of Soviet dissident movement the main claim of which was the claim to the authorities "to observe their own laws", and consider the fact that in today Russia there are political prisoners as a shame. I. Cohen (France) tells about the evolution of views of French "gauchists" during their struggle for the Right of prisoners. The report of Naum Nim (Editor in-Chief of "Index/Dossier na Tsenzuru" and "Nevolia") is dedicated to the influence of the prison, of the model of the behavior in prison on the society and the general atmosphere in the country. A. Cherkasov ("Memorial") gives detail of work of Human Rights activists in Chechnya before 2000. A. Smirnov states that today Human Rights movement in Russia is not consolidated. S. Markelov (advocate) speaks on the new quality of the political prisoners in today Russia. N. Zviagina (Saint-Petersburg, Legal Team) tells on the new technologies in organization of civil activities. O. Dzera speaks on difficulties of direct contact with prisons for Human Rights activists, about her experience of organization of committees of assistance to prisoners.

The last material of the block is not a report on the conference but an essay by V. Bushnev, O. Juravlev, E. Moskovkina, N. Savelieva (students and magistrants) on the difference in sociological approaches in France (1970ies) and in today Russia practice of monitoring.

In the block "Stories" we publish a literary work by A. Mulenko "The Myocardial Infarction" and a documental story by R. Gorchakov "From Convoy - into Custody" on a real destiny of American sailors in Soviet GULAG.

The last block is a material by an officer of penitentiary system A. Skalauh who analyses the existing principles of work with prisoners, their contradictions and effectiveness in approaching the main aim - adaptation of prisoners to the normal life in the society.

92006

Nevolia Journal No. 9-2006, PDF, Russian

As usually, the issue contains some statistical documents: The Criminality in Russia in 2000--2005 (data of Home Ministry); The Brief Characteristic of Penitentiary System in Russia (qualifying date 2006/08/01) (data of Federal Penitentiary Service), here are the number of prisoners and penitentiary workers, number of institutions, categories of prisoners and so on. Also we publish some European figures on the imprisonment (data, published by Ministry of Justice of France) as well as data of Amnesty International on convicted to death penalty. The first block opens Nils Christie analyzing the influence of penitentiary system on the health of prisoners. His conclusion is: the physicians must not enter in the penitentiary staff and have administrative independence.

The teacher of literature in a school in the colony for minor criminals, I. Holodiakov tells about real life of teenagers in colonies, about poor perspectives that expect them in freedom, about their need to have somebody adult and understanding for discuss real problems.

Olga Afanasieva in the article "Back Behind the Mirror" speaks on the problems which meet former prisoners in "normal" life. Their difficulties are explained mainly by absence of system of social adaptation and rehabilitation.

A. Konstantinov explains for readers what is "electronic bracelet" and why it may be useful for the humanization of penitentiary system. Another material of the same author "Know-how of Judges in Lipezk" is dedicated to the wholesome effect of European convention on the practice in some courts.

A. Livchak in the material "How did they investigate the Case of S. Loboda" shows a picture of full arbitrariness of penitentiary officers towards prisoners and their impunity.

The main block on the death penalty is opened by translation of a discussion of Michel Foucault, Jean Laplanche and Robert Badanter "Death Penalty: Criminal Personality or Dangerous System?", published in "Nouvel Observateur" in 1977, which did not lost the actuality for our country. The circumstances under which discussion was gone and the history of question in France are described by the translator of the material A. Bikbov.

A paradox point of view is expressed by I. Shevelev in the essay "Diversity of the Death World".

Not less paradox expresses V. Lozovskiin the essay "Maturity" where he proposes that the criminal himself should choose between death penalty and imprisonment for life.

A. Dobrovolskaya in the short material "Do not Kill!" speaks about impossibility of death penalty because it influence on the society in whole.

A. Konstantinov in the article "Some Problems of Imprisonment for Life in Russia" consider the real conditions of this category of prisoners since 1996: since this date the death penalty is not executed in Russia though it is not abolished yet.

V. Muhina considers the psychological characteristics of imprisoned for life in the article "Metamorphoses of Personality in Imprisonment for Life".

A. Savchenko publishes abstracts from letters of imprisoned for life under the title "Pardoned for eternal Imprisonment", citing one of the letters.

The block "History" contains an article by A. Sidorov "Prison Folk-lore of Belomorkanal", R. Gorchakov tells the story from annals of GULAG in Polar North, and A. Tarasov considers the history of psychiatry as a tool of oppression of political opponents since 1930ies till nowadays.

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